Workshop Summary

Friday Morning Workshops, November 10 ( 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM )


FR1 – The Practice of Resting and Digesting – Therapeutic Restorative Yoga in Recovery
Ann Saffi Biasetti, PhD, LCSW, E-RYT-500
Restorative yoga, a therapeutic form of yoga, has a direct influence on the parasympathetic nervous system and interoceptive awareness. Through direct experience of poses, case examples, and a specific verbal guide, participants will experientially learn the felt sense of the relaxation response in the body, interoceptive awareness, and body/mind integration.

Didactic, Experiential, Interactive • All Levels


FR2 – The Barbara M. Greenspan Memorial Lecture – Therapy and Activism: From Individual to Collective Healing
Carmen Cool, MA, LPC & Hilary Kinavey, MS, LPC
The problems that lead to disordered relationships with food and bodies are not only located within the individual but also within the larger culture. This workshop examines the benefits and challenges of moving between the role of treatment provider and social activist, exploring what it means to be a citizen-therapist.

Didactic, Experiential, Interactive • All Levels


FR3 –  The “Third Party”: The Effect of Eating Disorders on Attachment in Couples
Fran Gerstein, MSW, LCSW, BCD & Frani Pollack, MS, LSW, PhD
In couple’s counseling, the therapist often discovers a “third party”. That “third party” can be an eating disorder. This workshop will use Emotionally Focused Therapy, the Gottman Method and Internal Family Systems to explore how eating disorders affect attachment and connection. Clinical theory, case studies and videos will be used.

*New Jersey Social Workers: please see accreditation section

Didactic, Experiential • Intermediate/Advanced


FR4 – Beyond the Acronym: Understanding LGBTQIA+ Needs in Clinical Practice
Rebecca Newman, MSW, LCSW
This presentation will provide a comprehensive overview of terms and concepts relevant to clinical work with LGBTQIA+ individuals. Participants will improve their competency in interacting with factors including biological sex, sexual orientation, and gender identity, and integrating these biopsychosocial components into treatment for eating disorders and body image issues.

Didactic • All Levels


FR5 – Embodied Recovery: Trauma-Informed, Relationally-Oriented, and Somatically-Integrated
Paula Scatoloni, LCSW, CEDS, SEP & Rachel Lewis-Marlow, MS, EdS, LPC, LMBT
Embodied Recovery is a treatment model that emphasizes the body’s unique and essential role in fostering self-regulation, co-regulation and resiliency. This interactive workshop explores the somatic and psychological structures that govern attachment and defense systems in the development, maintenance, and treatment of eating disorders.

*New Jersey Social Workers: please see accreditation section

Interactive • Advanced


FR6 – “I Can Do Hard Things.” Building Emotional Tolerance in Eating Disorder Treatment – Part 1
Melanie Smith, MS, LMHC & Dee Franklin, MA
There is growing evidence that emotional avoidance is a crucial maintaining factor for eating disorders, as well as co-morbid conditions such as anxiety, depression, substance abuse and trauma. This workshop describes the conceptual framework for a transdiagnostic treatment of eating disorders, which emphasizes building emotional tolerance through emotional exposure.

*New Jersey Social Workers: please see accreditation section

Didactic • All Levels


Friday, 1:30-3:00 KEYNOTE PRESENTATION
Making Mental Health Essential Health

Patrick J. Kennedy
Clinicians and researchers have long known that mental health disorders create serious public health problems. In this keynote presentation Patrick J. Kennedy, a passionate advocate for mental health parity, examines why mental health is critical to the overall well-being of all Americans, and why the healthcare system needs to change, adapt and expand to better accommodate mental healthcare. To illustrate the underlying public policy imperatives of parity and the need to invest in innovation, Mr. Kennedy discusses the benefits of the newly passed 21st Century Cures Act, and the work of One Mind for Research and The Kennedy Forum. In addition, he provides a glimpse into his own journey towards mental health and recovery – sure to inspire the audience to mobilize resources to be advocates and agents of change.

*New Jersey Social Workers: please see accreditation section

Didactic • All Levels


Friday Afternoon Workshops, November 10 ( 3:30 PM – 6:30 PM )


FR7 – Targeting the “Internal Tyrant” in Eating Disorder Treatment
Ilene V. Fishman, LCSW, ACSW

Eating disorders are an outgrowth of an unhealthy defense mechanism – the “Internal Tyrant” – a hyper-vigilant response to outside criticism, best expressed as “I’ll get me before you get me.” This workshop presents a comprehensive explanation of the Internal Tyrant as a core element in the etiology and treatment of eating disorders.

*New Jersey Social Workers: please see accreditation section

Didactic, Interactive • All Levels


FR8 – The Body Speaks: Decoding Feelings, Thoughts and Patterns That Underlie Eating Disorders
Susan Kleinman, MA, BC-DMT, NCC, CEDS

Individuals with eating disorders suppress the experience of living in their bodies, focusing instead on food, weight, and distorted body perceptions. Therapeutic methods that emphasize processing bodily experience can provide clinical depth that words cannot reach. This presentation describes how to effectively weave embodied strategies into ongoing clinical work.

*New Jersey Social Workers: please see accreditation section

Experiential, Interactive • Intermediate/Advanced


FR9 – The Intuitive Therapist – Integrating Evidence-Based Practices with Transpersonal Psychology Principles
Dorie McCubbrey, PhD, MSEd, LPC, CEDS

Is the current emphasis on evidence based practices interfering with, and undermining intuitive insight? The inherent wisdom of both clinician and client can be enhanced with Eating Disorder Intuitive TherapyTM, which combines evidence based practices with transpersonal psychology principles. Case studies highlight this method for achieving lasting holistic recovery.

Interactive • Intermediate/Advanced


FR10 – Clinical Supervision: Guidelines When Working with Eating Disorder Patients and Their Families
Judith Ruskay Rabinor, PhD & Judith Brisman, PhD

Both evidence based data and clinical wisdom suggest eating disorders recovery is enhanced when family members are included in treatment. However, clinicians often are challenged about how to proceed. In this presentation two seasoned supervisors provide principles of engagement and strategic interventions to guide the treatment of complex family cases.

Didactic, Interactive • Intermediate/Advanced


FR11 – “I Can Do Hard Things.” Building Emotional Tolerance in Eating Disorder Treatment – Part II
Melanie Smith, MS, LMHC & Dee Franklin, MA

This workshop provides experiential demonstrations of food, body image and social exposures from The Renfrew Unified Treatment Model for Eating DisordersTM, an adaptation of the Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders. Attendance at Part I of the workshop is mandatory to attend Part II.

*New Jersey Social Workers: please see accreditation section

Experiential, Interactive • All Levels


FR12 – What Motivates Change? Translating Theory into Practice
Dana Sturtevant, MS, RD


Motivational Interviewing is an evidence-based, person-centered, guiding method of communication and counseling, which relies on an empathic, collaborative and accepting interpersonal style to elicit and strengthen intrinsic motivation for positive change. This experiential workshop offers a combination of principles, skills and strategies to help clients strengthen their commitment to change.

Experiential, Interactive • All Levels


Saturday, 8:30-10:00 KEYNOTE PRESENTATION:
Collaborative Care in the Treatment of Eating Disorders Across the Lifespan: Lessons Learned from Research and Practice

Janet Treasure, OBE, PhD, FRCP, FRCPsych & Adele Lafrance, PhD, CPsych
The cognitive interpersonal model of eating disorders asserts social-emotional factors not only predispose and maintain eating disordered attitudes and behaviors, but also generate difficulties in interpersonal relationships. These difficulties can confuse concerned caretakers, the most well-meaning of whom can be drawn into unhelpful behaviors, including accommodation and enabling, or emotional outbursts, criticism and denial. Emerging evidence suggests task-sharing interventions and emotion-focused support leads to improved outcomes for patients and caregivers alike. This keynote presentation provides a comprehensive overview of theory, practice, and research on the New Maudsley Model and Emotion-Focused Family Therapy, interventions that offer caregivers the wherewithal to foster genuine change in their loved ones.

*New Jersey Social Workers: please see accreditation section

Didactic, Interactive • All Levels


Saturday Morning Workshops, November 11 ( 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM )


SA1 – The Many Faces of ARFID: Let’s Get This Recognized and Treated
Karen Beerbower, MS, RD, LD, CEDRD

Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder, or ARFID refers to a patient cohort unable to meet appropriate nutritional and/or energy needs for reasons other than the drive for thinness. This presentation reviews current research about ARFID, and describes contemporary challenges, understanding about its presentation, clinical characteristics, complications, and best treatment practices.

*New Jersey Social Workers: please see accreditation section

Didactic, Interactive • Intermediate/Advanced


SA2 – Body Justice: Understanding the Intersection of Body Oppression and Social Justice
Melissa A. Fabello, MEd & Sonalee Rashatwar, LSW, MEd

Sociocultural issues play an important role in the experience of body image. Body justice is a radical perspective that articulates intersections of oppression in the development of body trauma. This workshop explores body justice, offering new perspectives to understand systemic body oppression, and concrete steps to reevaluate limitations in clinical work.

Interactive • Intermediate


SA3 – Treatment of Binge Eating Disorder and Body Image
Ann Kearney-Cooke, PhD

Binge eating is a feature of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. This workshop offers innovative treatment approaches for binge eating disorder, drawing from DBT, interpersonal psychotherapy, guided imagery, and journaling, and including strategies to improve self-regulation and manage energy. A body image program for binge eaters is described.

Didactic • Intermediate


SA4 – Clinical Intuition to Enhance a Creative Practice: The Beginner’s Mind – Part I
Terry Marks-Tarlow, PhD

Clinical intuition is a necessary ingredient for change regardless of therapeutic orientation. This presentation explores aspects of clinical intuition, including its neurobiology, and differences between creative spontaneity and impulsive enactment. Tools are offered to help clinicians turn fully into themselves and others, and open up to this particular person in this particular moment.

Didactic, Experiential, Interactive • All Levels


SA5 – The Embodiment of Interpersonal Neurobiology in the Treatment of Eating Disorder
Christine Schneider, PhD, LCSW & Alexandra Solaro, MA, LPC

Interpersonal neurobiology suggests that eating disorders are characterized by a lack of neural integration resulting in overly rigid and overly chaotic behavior. This presentation describes underlying principles of interpersonal neurobiology and illustrates the importance of using embodied techniques to promote neural integration in adults with eating disorders. It also includes role play with drama therapy.

Experiential • Intermediate/Advanced


SA6 – Collaborative Care: Increasing Supportive Efforts, Decreasing Therapy-Interfering Behaviors
Janet Treasure, OBE PhD FRCP FRCPsych & Adele Lafrance, PhD, CPsych

Careers of clients with EDs can present as unmotivated, helpless, or angry, creating difficulties for the most experienced clinicians. By the same token, clinicians report their own (very normal) emotional reactions to certain families. This workshop will outline a framework of basic steps for working with these challenging scenarios.

*New Jersey Social Workers: please see accreditation section

Didactic, Interactive • All Levels


Saturday, 2:00-3:30 KEYNOTE PRESENTATION: Feeding Hunger… A Journey of Self Discovery, Acceptance and Healing
Roxane Gay, PhD
As an outspoken “Bad Feminist”, Roxane Gay writes in her book Hunger, A Memoir of (My) Body, about food, weight and self-image using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance and health. In her keynote, Roxane will poignantly share her journey of discovering how the impact of trauma and being a woman of color and size, have shaped her relationship with food and her body. She will discuss what it means to learn to take care of yourself: how to feed your hungers for satisfying foods, a smaller and safer body, and a body that can love and be loved – in a time when the bigger you are, the smaller your world becomes.

*New Jersey Social Workers: please see accreditation section


Saturday Afternoon Workshops, November 11 ( 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM )


SA7 – Radically Open DBT: Openness, Flexibility, and Connection in Recovery
Ellen Astrachan-Fletcher, PhD, CEDS

Radically Open DBT is a treatment approach rooted in the neuroscience of emotional expression and social connectedness, which has shown strong promise in the treatment of anorexia nervosa. This presentation provides an overview of RO-DBT, emphasizing how it helps to facilitate social connectedness and emotional well-being among eating disorder patients.

Didactic, Interactive • All Levels


SA8 – Tackling Taboo Topics with African American Clients
Paula Edwards-Gayfield, MA, LPCS, CEDS; Charlynn Small, PhD, LCP, CEDS & Mazella B. Fuller, PhD, MSW, LCSW, CEDS

The phrase “Black is Beautiful” can have a significant impact on African American women as they encounter cultural messages that shape self-acceptance, body image and mental health. This workshop explores the impact, as well as the relationship between issues of race, ethnicity, social justice, acculturation, class, sexuality, and eating disorders.

*New Jersey Social Workers: please see accreditation section

Didactic, Interactive • All Levels


SA9 – Medical and Psychological Issues in the Wise Women Years
Jennifer L. Gaudiani, MD, CEDS, FAED & Margo Maine, PhD, FAED, CEDS

As many as 15% of women in midlife and beyond struggle with eating disorders. Informed by a biopsychosocial perspective this workshop explores their unique needs and experiences, and illustrates how to integrate physiological and psychological components of treatment in order to provide optimal interdisciplinary care, including empowering them to move from shame and silence into hope for the future.

*New Jersey Social Workers: please see accreditation section

Didactic • Intermediate/Advanced


SA10 – Creative Brain-Based Clinical and Nutritional Treatment of Eating Disorders
Laura Hill, PhD & Sonja Stotz, RD, LD

Eating disorders are severe, biological, brain-based disorders. Research has led to an increased understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying eating disorder symptoms, but there are no interventions that integrate empirical findings into treatment. This workshop introduces new, evidence-based clinical and nutritional treatment tools, and describes how they reflect neurobiological eating disorders research.

Experiential, Interactive • Advanced


SA11 – Clinical Intuition to Enhance a Creative Practice: Flowering into Wisdom – Part II
Terry Marks-Tarlow, PhD

Therapeutic wisdom represents the flowering of clinical intuition within a stance of humility, compassion, and non-judgment. This workshop explores the fallacies of common assumptions about clinical expertise, and stresses accepting uncertainty, ambiguity, and paradox. Therapists need to maintain self-care and give up the urgency to “fix” problems and “direct” outcomes. Attendance at Part I of the workshop is mandatory to attend Part II.

Didactic, Experiential, Interactive • All Levels


SA12 – Bringing Men to the Table: Research, Practice and Experience
Andrew Walen, MSSW, LCSW-C, LICSW, CEDS & Jerel Calzo, PhD, MPH

Drawing on research, practice and case examples, attendees will learn some of the nuances that inform development, treatment and presentation of males with eating disorders. Additional attention will be paid to shame and secrecy, outcomes and prevention. Attendees will be encouraged to share insights from their own clinical practice. Short and long term strategies for prevention and treatment will be discussed.

Didactic, Interactive • All Levels


Sunday Morning Workshops, November 12th (8:30 AM – 10:30 AM )


SU1 – Tools for Treating Eating Disorders in the Jewish Population
Rachel Bachner-Melman, PhD

Eating disorders occur across all levels of observance in the Jewish community. This workshop presents therapeutic tools and approaches for working with all Jewish clients, highlighting issues unique to the Orthodox community, and including ways to address doubt and rebellion and use Jewish traditions, blessing and prayers to support recovery.

Didactic, Interactive • All Levels


SU2 – Maudsley Myths and Collaborating With Families
Laura Collins Lyster-Mensh, MS & Lauren Muhlheim, PsyD, CEDS-S, FAED

Misconceptions abound about how, why, and when parents are involved during eating disorder treatment. This workshop describes and distinguishes between current treatment approaches that involve parents, and uses clinical material to address myths, misunderstandings, common critiques, risk factors and benefits, and contraindications about the several approaches.

*New Jersey Social Workers: please see accreditation section

Interactive • All Levels


SU3 – Do You “Like” Me: Social Media Use, Body Image and Eating Disorders
Nicole Hawkins, PhD, CEDS

Given the constantly increasing use of social media among girls and women, it is critical to determine if this trend impacts the incidence of eating disorders. This presentation examines how Facebook, Instagram, healthy living blogs, pro-anorexia and other social media sites contribute to negative body image and the development of eating disorders.

Didactic, Interactive • Beginner/Intermediate


SU4 – Living in This Queer Body: Treating Gender Nonconforming Patients
Asher Pandjiris, LMSW, MA & Jessica Kosciewicz, MS, RD

This workshop addresses the complexity of treating transgender patients who use disordered eating practices to manage body dissatisfaction. Clinical material is used to highlight the clinical challenge of working with the trans community, and to raise an awareness of a thus far unnoticed, but steadily growing, public health crisis.

Didactic, Interactive • Beginner/Intermediate


SU5 – Interpersonal Psychotherapy, the Best Kept Secret in Psychology
Cindy Goodman Stulberg, DCS, CPsych & Ronald Frey, PhD, CPsych

A number of researchers have demonstrated the efficacy of Interpersonal Psychotherapy, an evidence based practice, for the treatment of bulimia and binge eating disorder. Using a clinical and supervisory case example, this workshop demonstrates how new and seasoned clinicians from diverse disciplines can learn to successfully incorporate IPT into an ongoing practice.

Didactic, Experiential, Interactive • All Levels


SU6 – Evolving Field, Evolving Clinician: Effectively Integrating the New with the Old
Sandra Wartski, PsyD, CEDS

While eating disorder clinicians rely on finely-tuned skills, accumulated wisdom, and practiced clinical intuition, they must also grapple with how to integrate the growing body of new research findings and treatment approaches. This workshop uses clinical examples to explore the if, when, and how to incorporate new interventions to enhance ongoing treatment.

Didactic, Interactive • Advanced


11:15-12:45 KEYNOTE PRESENTATION: Research Gaps & Promising Practices: A Feminist, Social Justice Inquiry


Moderator: Beth Hartman McGilley, PhD, FAED, CEDS
Gayle E. Brooks, PhD; Rachel Calogero, PhD, FAED; Melissa-Irene Jackson, BS, BA & Marcella Raimondo, PhD, MPH

Strides have been made to bridge the research/practice gap in eating disorder treatment, with at least a dozen evidence-based therapies practiced worldwide. Still, no one therapeutic approach has proven unequivocally effective, and certain high-risk communities have yet to be adequately studied. This keynote panel, borrowing from feminist and social justice perspectives, and enlivened through panelists’ experiences and expertise, will examine the types and roles of research in the treatment of eating disorders, the impact on and implications of communities overlooked in research, and how we can expand the field to study and deliver effective practices to all those in need of care.

*New Jersey Social Workers: please see accreditation section

Didactic, Interactive • All Levels


12:45-1:00 CLOSING RITUAL
Adrienne Ressler, LMSW, CEDS, F.iaedp

As we prepare to return home, please join us in taking a few moments to reflect on our experience over this weekend, celebrate our connections and all that we have learned from our presenters and one another.